5 Basic Bail-Related Terms You Should Know

The bail process could become a tiring and overwhelming task for you, especially if you are foreign to the intricacies. You might encounter some terminologies that confuse you. Not to worry! Here are a few must-know definitions that may ease out your navigation to the bail process.

Bail Bond

The bail bond is a written document between the accused and the bail bondsman, which stipulates that the company will act as a surety to release the accused from jail. When you opt for a bail bond, you are only required to pay a small percentage of the full bail amount. Though you don’t get this fee back at the end of the case, as you do while posting a cash bill, you don’t have to come up with large sums of money that also cost time and effort.

Collateral

If you don’t have enough money to pay bail, but you own a possession that has enough value to cover the cost, for example, a house, you can offer that to the bail agent as your collateral. This is if the bail bond agent requests collateral at all. It is to be noted that collateral cannot be substituted for the bail fees, which is typically 10% of the entire bail amount. It always has to be paid to the bail agent.

Bail Conditions

During the temporary release on bail, you need to comply with certain conditions that the court might determine considering your criminal history and the crime for which you are accused. For example, if you were arrested for drunk driving your alcohol consumption will be restricted, along with going to places that serve alcohol. There are other common restrictions such as a curfew, compliance with travel limitations, and requirement for you to maintain or seek employment. Failure to comply with court orders will lead to your re-arrest and forfeiture of the money you paid for bail.

Warrant

A warrant is an official document, signed by a judge that gives the court permission to search your home, arrest you, or take some other action as deemed fit. If you disobey court laws, the court reserves the right to issue a warrant under your name. For example, if you do not show up at your hearing, the court will issue a bench warrant. Soon enough you will have a law enforcement officer at your door to take you back to jail.

Bail Recovery Agent

Another outcome of not attending your hearing is the confiscation of your bail amount. If the bail was posted through a bail bond agent, they are now required to arrest you and return you to jail so that they are not forced to pay the entire amount of the bail they posted on your behalf. At this point, any collateral that you may have pledged for your bail bond is also forfeited so that the bail amount can be paid to the court.

With these basic terms, your foundational knowledge of the bail process is good enough. If you need further help, call Avolevan Bail Bonds for free bail information. 909-721-8204. We serve cities like Chino and Chino Hills Bail Bonds, Bail bonds San Dimas, and Pomona Bail Bonds. We are the fastest acting bail agency in California. We will have your loved one out faster than anyone else.