Miranda Rights Explained

Miranda Rights Explained

When someone is arrested, they are not obligated to speak to the police. Most people have heard the phrase “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law.” This phrase, along with a couple of other sentences are known as Miranda Rights. Miranda Rights are not an extra set of rights, but rather an assurance of protection of your Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights and the right to an attorney.

Even though you are granted protection from speaking to the police, one can waive their Miranda Rights if they choose to. However, whatever they say can and will be used against them in the court of law. Since law enforcement officers have years of experience in getting people to confess to crimes, it is better to have an attorney speak on your behalf to better judge your case.

People can use their Miranda Rights when they are arrested. For example, if arrested, they have the right to not say a word to the police until they hire an attorney to speak on their behalf. Another time that people can use their Miranda Rights is when they are not properly read during an arrest. If the police officer does not fully and explicitly state the rights that they have, the validity of the entire case can be questioned.

Anyone that is arrested for a crime can use their Miranda Rights and if they do not get read to them during the arrest, the person can and should speak to as many witnesses as possible. This can heavily sway the case in their favor. Miranda Rights are a crucial part of our justice system and great protection for citizens of the United States

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